Book Review

Crows Are Not Better than Roses

Lost Crow Conspiracy (Blood Rose Rebellion #2)Lost Crow Conspiracy by Rosalyn Eves

My rating: 3.75 of 5 stars

Thank you, Penguin Random House, for giving me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

You think because I am a girl, I am weak. Because I speak for those who are given no voice here, my voice should matter less. You are wrong, on both counts. —Anna

Sequels are very unpredictable. You never know if they’re gonna hit the mark or miss it completely. I loved Blood Rose Rebellion when I read more than a year ago, so I was eager to dive into this book, believing that it would be even better. Unfortunately, most of my expectations weren’t met. To be optimistic about it, at least I enjoyed this book enough to give it more than 3 stars.

For the most part, Lost Crow Conspiracy was a very educational read. Just like the first book, it integrated much history into its fantastical plot. I rarely pick up historical fiction, so reading this book was an opportunity to widen my horizons. I enjoyed how the author retold the Austrian-Hungarian War and its global repercussions. She did it in a way that was unique, refreshing, and comprehensible. In other words, it was anything but info-dumpy. I was particularly fascinated by discriminated praetheria because their standpoint in European society was similar to that of the Jews during World War II. I wasn’t sure if this allusion was intentional. Nonetheless, I really appreciated it as someone fond of Christian history.

I also enjoyed Anna’s character development in this book. Anna continued to be underestimated because of her sex, but she didn’t hesitate to address the corruption in her society. Breaking the Binding definitely made her more mature because it pushed her to be a voice for the weak and oppressed. In a world ruled by men, she was one empowered female. Truth be told, the only thing I didn’t like about her was her tendency to lie to her loved ones; her refusal to tell anyone about Matyas’s “death” resulted in much undue stress. xD

As for Matyas, I was surprised that the author decided to keep him. I totally didn’t expect him to be resurrected. I had already become used to the idea of him being dead, so I didn’t care about his story arc. It didn’t help that his chapters were less interesting than Anna’s. In a way, his chapters felt like…fillers or padding. However, in light of his new powers as a shaman, it was clear that he still had much to contribute to the plot. I guess Anna would have had no allies if he hadn’t been there.

This book’s main weakness was its pacing. Oh my, the last 100 or so pages were difficult to get through because I almost fell asleep with boredom. It was weird because the climax was supposed to be the most exciting part of the novel. Anna had a price on her head, and her journey through various forests and villages was a drag. There was hardly any interesting confrontation since all she did was run and hide.

Overall, Lost Crow Conspiracy was intriguing and educational. I loved Anna’s character development and the book’s rich historical content. Still, some parts of the book were utterly boring. I gave the first book a higher rating, so I guess this one suffered from second book syndrome. Hopefully, the third installment will be better. 🙂

Book Review

The Red Queen of Tropes

Red Queen Collector’s EditionRed Queen Collector’s Edition by Victoria Aveyard

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The gods rule us still. They have come down from the stars. And they are no longer kind.

I gave Red Queen only 3 stars when I read it for the first time. So it’s weird that I’m now giving it 4 stars. Hahaha. Many people in the YA community have conflicted feelings about this book, which is supposedly a maelstrom of frustrating tropes.


It probably helped that I reread this book without high expectations. I merely wanted to have fun, so I did. I can honestly say that I was super entertained. By the dystopian-like world, the sibling rivalry, the fast-paced battle scenes, and more. I particularly loved the infamous plot twist although I wasn’t that amazed by it back in 2015.


It was darkly funny to witness Mare being manipulated by Maven, the “shadow to Cal’s flame”. Don’t get me wrong; I did like Mare in spite of the fact that she was such a Special Snowflake. I have watched a lot of reviews on BookTube discussing her lack of agency and whatnot. Then again, I didn’t expect much from her, so her personality didn’t annoy me. Truth be told, the only thing I could hold against her was Lucas Samos’s death. It was such a waste. 😦


Oh, did anyone else notice the Star Wars moment in the climax, when King Tiberias blames Mare for turning Maven against him, and she’s like…


HAHAHAHA. I can’t get over it! It might sound funny, but this rip-off scene is the main reason why I can’t give this book 5 stars. The fact that Victoria Aveyard mentioned George Lucas in the Acknowledgements doesn’t change anything. My eyes are still rolling.


In the end, I am proud of myself for giving Red Queen another chance. Buying this beautiful collector’s edition definitely increased my motivation. Harharhar. My copy of Glass Sword has been preserved in plastic since 2016, and I’m so pumped to flip through the fresh pages. And yeah, I have heard MANY BAD THINGS about both Glass Sword and King’s Cage. According to the grapevine, Mare becomes more annoying. Strangely, this makes me very excited. Reverse psychology works wonders! xD


Book Review

My Plain Governess

My Plain Jane (The Lady Janies, #2)My Plain Jane by Cynthia Hand

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thank you, Harper Collins, for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

For everyone who’s ever fallen for the wrong person, even though we agree that Mr. Darcy looks good on paper…and in a wet shirt.

I absolutely loved My Lady Jane when I read it two years ago. In fact, it was my favorite novel of 2016. Hence, I had nothing but high expectations before delving into My Plain Jane. In totality, it was a very entertaining novel although I wasn’t familiar with the story of Jane Eyre. Still, I couldn’t give it five stars because it was compared to My Lady Jane, it was not that good.

For the most part, My Plain Jane retains the main plot points of Jane Eyre. It follows an orphan girl who becomes a governess and falls in love with her suspicious employer. But in this case, Jane Eyre is a seer, which means that she is able to see and communicate with ghosts. Alexander Blackwood, the star agent of a failing organization called the Society for the Relocation of Wayward Spirits, wants to hire Jane. Unfortunately, she doesn’t want to leave her darling Mr. Rochester. Alexander then enlists the help of Charlotte Bronte (yes, she is a character in this book), a talented writer who has taken it upon herself to write a novel about her best friend (Jane Eyre). To simply put it, this book is both a retelling and an origin story of Jane Eyre.

The Lady Janies sure do know how to make their readers laugh. I really had a good time reading this book, especially when they interrupted the narrative to address me and make me feel that I was a part of the story. The authors utilized this tactic in My Lady Jane, and it worked its magic once again in this book. Another magical thing was the cohesion of the writing. The book was written by three different authors, but I didn’t have the feeling that I was comprehending three different writing styles. In other words, the Lady Janies’ respective literary voices were super compatible.

In retrospect, even though Jane Eyre and the other protagonists weren’t problematic in the truest sense of the word, I didn’t become attached to most of them. I did like them, but they were quite plain compared to the characters in My Lady Jane. Looking on the bright side, at least I was very fond of Helen, Jane Eyre’s other best friend who happened to be a ghost. Helen was the primary source of humor in the story, constantly nagging Jane about things both trivial and important. It was also intriguing to see Charlotte Bronte as a fictional character. My reading experience became more meaningful because I often wondered if her personality was inspired by the real Charlotte Bronte. If the authors had to read biographies or whatnot before writing this book, then I applaud them for doing so. In any case, it was not surprising that I was able to relate to her love for reading and writing.

My Plain Jane actually downplayed the romance between Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. This wasn’t necessarily bad because I wasn’t expecting to read a cheesy love story. However, Mr. Rochester lacked character development. He was not in Thornfield Hall most of the time, and most of his brief interactions with Jane Eyre made him seem like a villain. The cause of this phenomenon was eventually explained, but it would’ve been better if I had been given the chance to know the “real” Mr. Rochester. 😉 His “fake” personality was more bothersome than interesting.

The last problem I encountered was the inconsistent pacing. The pacing was generally smooth, but it became rushed, especially during the climax of the book. Many significant things happened in succession to the point that my brain found it hard to keep up. For example, the protagonists were caught in a number of problems throughout the novel, and it didn’t take more than a chapter or two to solve them. Sometimes, this caused the characters to be all over the place, as if they could teleport or something.

All things considered, My Plain Jane was an enjoyable and memorable read. If I took my love for My Lady Jane out of the picture, I would probably give this book a higher rating. Still, a four-star rating is high enough. Haha. I can’t wait to read another retelling by the Lady Janies. I wonder who’s gonna be their next inspiration. I’m sure that history has more Janes to write about. xD

*The featured image was contributed by Dessa Mae Jacobe (@dessatopia)

Book Review


EverlessEverless by Sara Holland

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

You were always like that—so trusting. —Liam

I’m gonna keep things short because my feelings for this book are on neutral ground. I loved the overall concept of this book; it was my first time to read about a world wherein time was a commodity/currency. The unique premise and rich world-building made Everless a fast-paced and entertaining read. It was actually a cover-buy, so I’m glad that it wasn’t a waste of money. xD

However, this book fell short, particularly in terms of character development. Most of the supporting characters, such as Roan and Liam, were not fleshed out, so I just had to rely on YA tropes in order to predict their “essence” or intentions. This made me jaded and disappointed because I did not enjoy having to rely on character stereotypes from popular books (i.e. Red Queen). As for the heroine, Jules, I did not like her that much because she often let her emotions cloud her judgement. She was especially weak (and kinda pathetic) during the penultimate part of the book. Hopefully, she’ll mature (both mentally and physically) in the sequel. Looking on the bright side, her devotion to her family and friends was admirable; she didn’t hesitate to sacrifice her well-being if it meant saving her loved ones.

In totality, Everless was entertaining at best and predictable at worst. It didn’t give me a stellar reading experience, but it was good enough to make me want to read the next book. If you also bought this novel because of its gorgeous cover, rest assured that the cover wasn’t designed to cover up bad content. Nevertheless, don’t expect this book to blow your mind.

Book Review

My Lady Bookworm

My Lady Jane (The Lady Janies, #1)My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The past is malleable and flexible, changing as our recollection interprets and re-explains what has happened.

—Peter L. Berger

I happily give My Lady Jane five, heavenly stars. This is possibly my most favorite book of 2016. As I write this review, I am overwhelmed by this bittersweet feeling because I am very satisfied with how the story turned out, but I am very sad to say good-bye to such a wonderful historical retelling.

I loved this book primarily because it featured characters who were nothing but priceless. Jane, Gifford (G), and Edward are henceforth my literary baes. Even though My Lady Jane is nearly 500 pages long, I kinda wished it would never end because I wanted to spend more time with these pseudo-fictional characters.

Jane was unforgettably relatable. I adored her unwavering love for books, Hermione-like intellect, and ability to stand up for herself in a very sexist/patriarchal environment. She really wasn’t a girl whom people (especially men) could mess with. Yes, she was occasionally quite mean and stubborn, but I couldn’t help but think of her as every male bookworm’s dream girl.

Gifford (G) was charmingly bookish in his own way. He had a knack for poetry, which I found to be impressive and downright romantic. The “historical twist” to his talent with words also made him a very intriguing character. 😉 What really made him special in my eyes was his positive attitude towards femininity. Instead of being intimidated by the opinionated Jane, he did his best to understand, protect, and treat her as his equal.

As for Edward, he was the protagonist who made me laugh the most. It was interesting how his sexist comments sounded both annoying and endearing. Furthermore, his subtle advances towards a certain girl were hilarious. He was admittedly inexperienced in romance, but he was surprisingly good at it. I especially liked him because of his outstanding character development.

One of the best things I liked about this novel was it’s lively, quirky, and magical approach to history, which I humbly admit was not my favorite subject in school because it was often quite…tedious. There were lots of historical elements in this book, and although they were indeed altered according to the authors’ liking, I loved how they still retained essential bits of truth.

To be more precise, I particularly enjoyed relearning the familial troubles of the Tudors, the violent tension between the Catholics and Protestants, and the political alliance of France and Scotland (against England). I’ve been a fan of similar historical retellings like Reign and The Other Boleyn Girl, so I had a lot of fanboy moments while reading My Lady Jane.

In the end, I applaud the Lady Janies for a job well done. In light of all its virtues, I am sure that this book will go down in history as one of the best works YA literature has to offer. I do hope to read it again someday. 😀

*Featured image contributed by Dessa Mae Jacobe (@dessatopia)

Book Review

This Is Not About Animals

The Bear and the NightingaleThe Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

All the ancient classic fairy tales have always been scary and dark.

—Helena Bonham Carter

The Bear and the Nightingale was delightful to read. I’ve always been a fan of fairy tales (and their retellings), so I was more than eager to delve into the story. From the get-go, I want to say that this book is not for everyone, especially for readers who dislike slow story lines. On the other hand, if you love character-driven books, then you would probably enjoy this novel like I did.

I primarily gave this book four stars because it became my personal primer on Russian culture. Before I read it, I practically knew next to nothing about the latter. I was exposed to variety of Russian names that were both fun and difficult to memorize. I was also introduced to the old government and religion of Russia, which confuses (if not intrigues) me until now. Finally, I was thrown into the fascinating world of Russian folklore and its treasury of dark creatures. In totality, The Bear and the Nightingale was very educational, but it was not in a boring, academic way. The author said she isn’t Russian, so I was very impressed that she still knew Russia like the back of her hand.

The plot of this book was quite reminiscent of The Queen of the Tearling. Vasya, a supposedly plain/ugly girl, was given a pendant that would supposedly help her overcome a “great evil.” I actually liked this similarity, because I was once again caught up in solving the mystery of a simple trinket’s power. In retrospect, the pacing was undeniably slow, and it was because of one, major reason: too many POVs.

I am normally fond of books with multiple perspectives. However, my brain can only handle so much. The Bear and the Nightingale had an abundance of characters, and almost all of them were given their own chapters to narrate. This resulted in a broader sense of objectivity because it felt like I wasn’t missing any of the characters’ thoughts and actions. Still, I was more interested in Vasya’s chapters, so I sometimes became frustrated when I did not know what was happening to her anymore. Given her sporadic appearances in the book, one would think she wasn’t the main protagonist. Nevertheless, I applaud the author for the outstanding development of her characters.

Ultimately, The Bear and the Nightingale had more virtues than flaws. I enjoyed it a lot because of its dark yet enlightening content. I’m not sure if this is just a stand-alone novel, but I am highly anticipating a sequel.

*The featured image was contributed by Dessa Mae Jacobe (@dessatopia)

Book Review

To Take a Heart

To Kill a KingdomTo Kill a Kingdom by Alexandra Christo

My rating: 4.75 of 5 stars

Thank you, Macmillan, for giving me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

How strange that instead of taking his heart, I’m hoping he takes mine.

Someone please give me another book by dear Alexandra Christo because I absolutely enjoyed this one! Next to The Cruel Prince, it’s the most captivating book I have read this year. Anyone who loves fairy tale retellings will devour this book in a day. However, since it’s such a good book, I recommend savoring it for as long as possible!

To Kill a Kingdom is a dark reimagining of The Little Mermaid. Lira, also known as the Prince’s Bane, is a siren infamous for literally stealing the hearts of more than a dozen male royals. After Lira is forced to kill one of her own, the tyrannical Sea Queen turns her into a human and commands her to redeem herself by killing Prince Elian, the heir to the most powerful kingdom in the world. Interestingly, he also happens to be a talented hunter of sirens. Despite their divergent backgrounds and loyalties, Lira and Elian might be the key to ending the war between the land and sea.

Before I requested this book from the publisher, I already had a feeling that I was going to love it. Reviewers whom I trust had given it five stars, so I was all the more excited to delve into the story. To my delight, all of my expectations were met; the characters were compelling, the plot was perfectly fast-paced, and the writing was beautiful in its simplicity. I really wanted to savor this book, but I just couldn’t put it down (even in the workplace).

Lira had excellent character development. Her brutality at the beginning of the novel made it clear that she was a force to be reckoned with and that she deserved her title as the Prince’s Bane. In fact, she was so empowered that her mother, the Sea Queen, unwillingly saw her as a threat. As the story progressed, Lira’s humanity began to show itself. It was fascinating to see her grapple with her conflicting desires. Killing Elian would prove that she was worthy to be queen someday, but it would also mean that she wasn’t any different from her heartless mother. I was so happy that Lira was able to make the right decision in the end by following both her heart and brain. In totality, she more than did justice to Disney’s Ariel.

Prince Elian was similarly fleshed out. In spite of his stereotypical daddy issues, I liked him a lot because he did not allow revenge to overcome his moral compass. He was indeed talented in killing sirens, but he didn’t necessarily enjoy it. And when he discovered Lira’s betrayal, he still had the willingness to love and forgive her. If I were in his shoes, I would be angrier at Lyra for a longer time. Haha. Nevertheless, I admired Elian because it took guts to give a second chance to an ex-murderer.

Like I mentioned before, it was hard for me to take a break from this book. It came to a point that it consumed my breaks at work. Each chapter was relatively short and ended with a cliffhanger, so it took much effort not to neglect my professional responsibilities. It didn’t matter that I already had an idea about how the book would end; I was 100% invested in Lira and Elian’s journey to lasting happiness. The fast pace could be also attributed to the author’s penchant for amusing dialogue. Lira and Elian’s conversations never failed to make me laugh. I couldn’t get enough of their banter!

The world-building was the last thing I liked about this book. I was surprised that the author established a difference between sirens and mermaids. Sirens, like Lira, were powerful stealers of human hearts. Mermaids, on the other hand, were weaker and didn’t always kill humans. I found this dichotomy refreshing and memorable because sirens and mermaids are typically one and the same in books and other forms of media.

Yes, I loved this book enough to give it a high rating. But I would’ve loved it more if it didn’t use the bad parent trope. I hated the Sea Queen as much as the characters did, but I wasn’t happy that she didn’t seem to have any redeeming qualities; she was just a horrible mother. As for Elian’s father, he was a bad parent in that he was a source of pressure and undue stress. In fact, he was one of the reasons why Elian didn’t want to go home to Midas. Can’t we have more good parents in YA, please? xD

All in all, I highly recommend To Kill a Kingdom. You don’t have to doubt the hype because it’s completely justified. Given how great of a retelling it is, I wouldn’t be surprised if it were adapted into a film someday.